Three Things Your Business Can Learn from the Jersey Shore

And we’re not talking GTL, baby

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If you haven’t been exposed to the pop-culture phenomenon, the Jersey Shore, you are probably more sane than I am (not a tough accomplishment, actually). But the kids that made “GTL” (Gym-Tan-Laundry) the catch phrase of the year can also teach you some lessons about your business (seriously).

Here are three things your business can learn from the Jersey Shore:

A focused, rabid audience can trump a broad, unfocused one

In TV, like business, niches rule. Just because it’s not everyone’s cup of tea (or perhaps, more appropriately, canteen of vodka), doesn’t mean that there isn’t a market for it.

Jersey Shore has been MTV’s best show in years and the #1 summer show across cable because it knows its audience and its audience eats it up.

Emulate this strategy by being willing to focus on developing a strong core following instead of trying to be all things to all people.

Bold is better than bland

It’s better to stand for something rather than nothing, even if what you stand for may seem ridiculous to the masses. Since you are focusing on your core audience, don’t be afraid to push the envelope (unless your target audience is the vanilla pudding type).

You shouldn’t worry about pissing people off; Jersey shore has upset all kinds of organizations and created uproars in all kinds of venues. That has only helped their success.

Strike while the iron is hot

You can buy all kinds of things branded Jersey Shore and expect more to come. Even “The Situation” has his own iPhone app that is being reported to be one of Apple’s Top 10 highest-grossing applications. The MTV folks and their “stars” realize that that no business cycle lasts forever, so they are maximizing the brand’s potential while it is en fuego.

Keep this same strategy in mind in your business. Business cycles are shortening, so don’t be afraid to make the most of your opportunities while you are hot.

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